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Memorial-Overholt, John A.
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John A. Overholt
November 2, 1895 – November 10, 1976  

     JUDGE SHURE: Mr. President. 

     MR. PRESCOTT: May it please the Court, I would now like to introduce Mr. Glenn O. Hall, who will speak on behalf of Mr. John A. Overholt. 

     JUDGE SHURE: Mr. Hall. 

     MR. HALL: Thank you, Mr. Prescott. 

     May it please the Court, members of the Bar, Mrs. Overholt, ladies and gentlemen, during the past 13 years, I had the pleasure of enjoying the friendship and association of John A. Overholt. We associated ourselves in the practice of law in Kensington shortly after Mr. Overholt was burned out of his original offices. It was an excellent relationship. 

     John was born on November 2, 1895 in Manito, Illinois. He graduated from Havana Illinois High School in Havana, Illinois. He attended the Ben Franklin University in Washington, D. C. from 1919 to 1920, and John graduated from Columbus Law School, the predecessor to Catholic University Law School, in 1925. 

     His life was dedicated to public service and his interests were always in that direction. He entered the U. S. Government service in 1917 and joined the military service that same year and served with the American Expeditionary Forces in France in 1918 and 1919. After the war he returned to his job in Government and served for many years with the U. S. Civil Service Commission. He also served in the U. S. Treasury Department. He served the Government, his Government, until he was forced to retire after forty years service with a physical disability in 1956 while he was in his 60th year. 

     It was thereafter, at the age of 61, that John took up the private practice of law, his second full career. Although he was as old as almost any two of us in the office, twice the age of most of us, John was in the office every day by 9:00 and he worked in the office every day until at least 5:00 five days a week, unless he was lecturing at preretirement seminars or attending conventions nationally for interests he represented. For those of us who worked with him, one of our most memorable experiences was our office party to celebrate his 81st birthday. That was last year, eight days before he died. We had an office celebration while he was there working. 

     He didn’t give up his interest in public service when he left government. He was a founder of the national Association of Retired Civil Employees and served as their national legal counsel until his death. He and his wife were founders of Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Parish and were active in The Holy Names Society there. 

     During his long life, Mr. Overholt belonged to and gave his support to many religious and civic organizations. Some of these organizations were the American Legion, where he was a Commander. He was Grand Knight of the Rock Creek Council of the Nights of Columbus. He was Commander of his VFW Post. He worked actively in the Chamber of Commerce in Bethesda for many years. He was active for many years in the Lyons Club, the Kensington-Wheaton Branch, and, of course, he was a member of the Montgomery County Bar Association and many other Bar Associations. 

     John and Norbertine S. Reed were married in 1920. They had been married 57 years at the time of his death. Mrs. Overholt and John were the proud parents of two daughters,one surviving, Mrs. Marie O. Steiner of Lancaster, Ohio. John died November 10, 1976 and has been and will continue to be sorely missed by his family, his friends, and associates. 

     Some people live a long life. John Overholt served a long life. His life and services were inspiration to all who knew him. 

     Thank you.

 

     JUDGE SHURE: Judge Mathias will respond for the Court. 

     JUDGE MATHIAS: I cannot say that I had the privilege of being a,quote, friend of John Overholt, but I knew him as a neighbor. We worshiped in the same church. He was always a kind and pleasant man. 

     On the occasions when I had the opportunity to observe his work as a lawyer, he demonstrated a sterness, thoroughness, and competence that made him a credit to the profession. I shall miss John at Sunday Mass and I shall miss him in this courthouse, but I can say that he made his mark as a practicing attorney and was respected and admired by his brothers at the Bar and he earned the right to have his name enshrined for all time upon the minutes of this court. 

     JUDGE SHURE: Thank you, Judge.