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Memorial-Nussbaum, Hyman
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Hyman Nussbaum
1919 – May, 1967  

Judge Shook. Mr. Jacobs 

Mr. Jacobs. In memory of the late Hyman Nussbaum I should like to call upon Dale L. Button, Esquire.

 

Mr Button. If Your Honors please? 

Judge Shook. Mr. Button. 

Mr. Button. It was my pleasure to be associated with Hyman Nussbaum during the last few years of his life, my pleasure and I consider it sincerely my good fortune. We shared office quarters in Bethesda for the last two or three years of his life. 

     Hyman Nussbaum firmly believed, from my observation, that it was a primary consideration of a practicing attorney that he should be first of all a gentleman; a gentleman to all people, to the lay public, to his clients and to the fellow members of the bar. Hyman was particularly disappoined on those fortunately rare occasions when he felt he might be dealing with a member of the bar who was guided by less lofty scruples than he felt he should be. 

     Hyman did not interpret these considerations, however, to mean a lack of determination in behalf of his clients. I was over and over impressed by his tenacity of purpose in defending the interests of clients whom he had taken into his hands. 

     I firmly believe that all people, members of the lay pubicc, of the profession and other members of the bar could have only a lofty impression of the legal profession and of the judicial system after having known Hyman Nussbaum personally and his work as a member of the profession. 

     Thank you, very much. 

 

Mr. Jacobs. May it please the Court: in preparing this scheduled memorial service it came to my attention that Hyman was one of the people that we were honoring on this occasion. 

     Hyman died in May of last year at the age of forty-eight. He was born and raised in South Carolina and there is where he went to school, graduated from the University of South Carolina as well as its law school. He served in World War II and upon completion of his military service he settled down in the general area of Washington. 

     “Hy” became one of the section heads of the Corporation Counsel’s Office in the District of Columbia and after several years as a leader in the community decided to practice law, himself. I had the good fortune of being associated with “Hy” in the practice of law in Bethesda, and to me he represented some of the highest ideals that an attorney ever hopes to stand for. 

     He never took a case because it was a case; he took it because it meant more to him, it meant, it had to mean that what he was doing was right, that what his client was advocating was right. And when he took the case he worked to his fullest extent to see that it came out right. 

     I never met a man with a more warm personality, a fine character and the type of man who strove to do what he actually preached, all the time. He put forth as if to exemplify the very ideals of which he spoke. 

     He was at one time president of the Argo Lodge of the B’nai B’rith, which is a men’s group; was a Mason; was a former Commander of the Jewish War Veterans after World War II. He is survived by three sons and a daughter. 

     I know that he in fact has always wanted to to try to leave an indelible impression in people’s minds that he represented the highest ideals that the legal profession stands for, and when Dale spoke a minute ago I think that is what he was trying to convey: that “Hy” represented in every respect the high ideals of the legal profession and he worked to his fullest extent to put them into practice. 

     I know we will all cherish the memory of Hyman Nussbaum. 

 

Judge Shook. Responding for the Court is the Honorable Irving A. Levine. 

Judge Levine. Thank you, Judge Shook, for affording me this brief opportunity on behlalf of the Court; Judge Anderson and Mrs. Nussbaum. 

     I had been on the bench a relatively short time before “Hy” Nussbaum’s untimely passing, so that the opportunity and the occasion for him to appear before me was somewhat limited in that regard; however, it was my privilege to become acquaintained with him shortly after he moved to this area from his native state of South Carolina just after World War II, and we became good friends over the ensuing years. In addition we were adversaries on a number of occasions, so that I had ample opportunity to know of his high professional ability and his conduct as an officer of this court. 

     One need only to have known “Hy” for a short time to become aware of his remarkable and extraordinary diligence as a lawyer, and his devotion and loyalty to his client’s cause. As his colleagues have already noted, he was an able lawyer who conducted himself in accordance with the highest standards of this Bar and the noble criteria of his profession. 

     For these reasons I assent to those remarks and acknowledge them on behalf of the Court.