Print Page   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Join BAMC
Memorial-Koepenick, Edward L.
Share |
Edward L. Koepenick
1916 – 1974 

JUDGE SHURE: Mr. Sheehan.

MR. SHEEHAN: Out of the respect of Edward L. Koepenick I call upon Shelly Schuman.

MR. SCHUMAN: Your Honors, members of the family of Edward Koepenick, ladies and gentlemen, Ed was not only my law partner by my friend. Shortly after completing my clerkship in this court I became associated in the practice of law with Edward Koepenick and Harold Patterson. Both Ed and Pat died within four months of each other.

The closeness of their untimely deaths were of a catastrophic nature. Because of the difference in age between myself, Ed was like a father to me. This was very natural for Ed since Ed had four sons of his own.

He had not only a clear understanding of the law, but he also had good judgment on ethical matters. Ed was not only a good man, but Ed had a marvelous sense of humor. No matter how dismal a problem may have appeared he would always approach it in a cheerful manner. Ed was dedicated to the service of our profession. He spent countless hours representing indigent clients for the Legal Aid Committee.

My memory of this wonderful man will always stay with me. Ed was born in Illinois. He came to Washington as a youth with his family. He was an owner of the Embassy Dairy. He left to devote his full time to practice of the law. He received his doctorate of law from Georgetown University. Because of his experience in the dairy business, he represented a dairy association.

He was a member of the Board of Directors of the Catholic Youth Organization. He also had been a Director of the Dairymen Remembrance Fund. Ed was fifty-eight when he died. He is survived by his wife Evelyn and four sons, Daniel, Edward, Gary and Martin.     

JUDGE SHURE: Judge Cahoon will respond for the Court.

JUDGE CAHOON: Thank you, Judge Shure, for this privilege of responding for the Court. Our administration of justice is a civilized alternative to more primitive and barbaric methods. It is essential that the participants are civil. The pillars in the structure are those that live by the substance and not merely the form.

Such a pillar was Ed Koepenick. He was a gentle person, kind in thought and deed, and generous to those needs he knew, firm in his principals. He was also friendly and modest.

He was thoughtful, thorough, and careful professional. He made unstinting and purposeful contributions to the Bar committee services.

All of this is a magnificent legacy for us to memorialize and his family to cherish.