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Memorial-Klooz, Marie S.
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Marie S. Klooz
December 29, 1901 – December 29, 2002 

Marie Stuart Klooz was born on December 29, 1901 in Louisville, KY. She attended elementary and high school in Pittsburgh, PA and received her AB degree from Sweet Briar College, Sweet Briar, VA in 1923. She studied at the University of Chicago in 1924 while living at the University of Chicago Settlement house where she taught English to foreigners. Then, after further study at the University of Pittsburgh, she obtained a teaching certificate and taught high school in Aspinwall, PA for a semester. In 1939, she received a MA from Columbia University in International Law and International Relations. She also completed all the requirements, passing the orals, for a PhD but "never revised her dissertation to clinch the degree from Columbia in international law, finding practical work more interesting." She was awarded the LLB degree from George Washington University Law School in 1960.

"A month's visit to New Orleans during Mardi Gras in 1925 inspired a desire to visit France and Italy, which was gratified in 1929 and 1931, respectively. Her first paying job was as a sports writer on the Philadelphia EVENING PUBLIC LEDGER, 1926-27. Later she was a news reporter and feature writer for the PITTSBURGH POST GAZETTE, 1927-29. She wrote a sequel to H.O. Yardley's THE AMERICAN BLACK CHAMBER, which was seized by the government and now rests in the Archives (rumor has it.) Later she did a brief stint as a social investigator for Emergency Home Relief in New York in 1934, and as reader and assistant editor for G.P.Putnam's Sons, 1937-38, followed by free lance editing. When World War II came, she became a pacifist and began attending Riverside Friends Meeting."

After coming to Washington in 1942 she held a number of mid-level government jobs at the Library of Congress, Department of Commerce and Department of State. She was riffed after the war and was unemployed for several years until she became a stenographer at the Department of State for a brief period from 1951-53. After a short period doing secretarial work at Westtown School and the American Friends Service Committee, she worked as a researcher with the Friends Committee on National Legislation to abolish the draft. In October 1955, she became research assistant to the legislative secretary of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, a position she held until January 1961. After completing her law degree (1960) and admission to the bar (1961), she became Librarian of the American Society of International Law where she remained until February 1965 when she became a full-time staff attorney of Neighborhood Legal Services. While she was at the American Society of International Law, she maintained a private practice, handling legal aid matters. She also was a member of the Lawyer's Panel of the National Capitol Area Civil Liberties Union and served on a D.C. Bar panel which responded to night calls from police precincts when an arrested person requested an attorney.

She moved her law office to Rockville, MD in 1970 and retired from the active practice of law in 1976. "Since her retirement she has continued her interest in legal matters, engaging in research and writing," she wrote in the early 1980s. She moved to a cottage at Friends House in 1969 and transferred her membership to Sandy Spring Monthly Meeting and "has since then been involved with Monthly and Yearly Meeting activities." In 1988, she moved into Friends House as a result of increasing health problems including low vision. She progressed into Haviland Hall and finally in 1991 was admitted to Friends Nursing Home.

 

Elizabeth Farquhar