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Memorial-Kiley, J. Ambrose
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J. Ambrose Kiley
March 31, 1902 – April 11, 1980 

JUDGE MATHIAS: I call upon Joseph King to speak in memory of Ambrose Kiley. 

     MR. KING: May it please the Court and the members of his family and guests. 

     I am honored to be here and I am honored to be asked to speak on behalf of J. Ambrose Kiley who truly became a friend of mine in a very short period of time. In fact, we were only associated for about a year and a half. 

     I did some checking, and Mr. Kiley was born on March 31, 1902. He graduated from St. Mary’s College in Duluth, Minnesota and attended Georgetown University where he graduated with two degrees, one a Ph.D. in Philosophy and the other a Doctor of Law. During World War II he served in Strategic Services under Bill Donovan which was the forerunner of the current C.I.A. 

     Mr. Kiley has three children, Genevieve Marie Niles, Jeffrey Alan Kiley and Margo Ann Kiley. Mr. Kiley was also a very religious man and was very active in the Catholic Church and a member of St. John’s the Baptist Catholic Church in Silver Spring where he is buried. 

     Mr. Kiley was a very interesting and unique individual and it was a great pleasure to sit and talk to him and find out that he had practiced law for nearly a half century in the Washington, D.C. area as well as Montgomery County. He loved to talk and had many stories to tell about these years and was a very enchanting individual. 

     One thing that impressed myself through my association with Mr. Kiley was his tremendous integrity and soundness of character. Those two traits were woven through his professional and his personal life and were very important to him and was a very good learning and teaching tool to attorneys who were trying to start practice in this County. 

     One thing that was so important to Mr. Kiley during his career was that the word of an attorney was the backbone of the profession and if you couldn’t believe an attorney then we were in a lot of trouble and this saddened him greatly during his career as his one principle that he treasured so dearly had diminished to some degree. 

     My experience with Mr. Kiley, along with my office staff, was a great treasure and as I said there’s no way to replace that time. Unfortunately we did not have many days and months together. We were all saddened because he was a truly interesting and fantastic individual. 

     If it please the Court, I would request that these remarks be incorporated in the record. 

     JUDGE MATHIAS: Thank you, Mr. King. 

     I will respond for the bench. 

     Ambrose Kiley was a man with a smile and a cheerful word whenever I had the good fortune to encounter him in the corridors of the court. He was one of the oldest members of the Bar Association. Nevertheless whenever I greeted him by asking how are you today, Mr. Kiley, his response was always the same. Very well, he said, for a young man. Thank you. 

     Ambrose Kiley had the grace and the charm of a gentleman of the old school and he was a practitioner who enjoyed the respect of all those who knew him. 

     Mr. Clerk, you will please enter these remarks upon the permanent Minutes of this court in memory of J. Ambrose Kiley.