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Memorial-Helm, William P.
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William P. Helm
1932 – December 28, 1969 

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR MONTGOMERY COUNTY, MARYLAND

M E M O R I A L   S E R V I C E 

Rockville, Md. 

October 5, 1970 

2:00 p.m. 

In Memory of:

 

WILLIAM P. HELM

PAUL Q. CUDDY

KENNETH PAUL LYDDANE

 

Presiding Judges: 

THE HONORABLE KATHRYN J. SHOOK 

THE HONORABLE JAMES H. PUGH 

THE HONORABLE RALPH G. SHURE 

THE HONORABLE WALTER H. MOORMAN 

THE HONORABLE JOSEPH H. MATHIAS 

THE HONORABLE JOHN P. MOORE 

THE HONORABLE PLUMMER M. SHEARIN 

THE HONORABLE IRVING A. LEVINE 

THE HONORABLE H. RALPH MILLER

 Also Present:

JOHN H. MCAULIFFE, Esq., President

Montgomery County Bar Association 

J. AMBROSE KILEY, Esq., Chairman

Memorial Committee 

Court Reporter:

Carol E. Duncan

  

P R O C E E D I N G S 

     JUDGE SHOOK: Court convenes today to conduct a Memorial Service for departing members of the Bar. 

     The Court would recognize Mr. McAuliffe. 

     MR. McAULIFFE: May it please Your Honors, in the highest edition of the Bench and Bar, this Court suspends its usual activities and takes time to pay respects to remember the departed brothers of the Bar who have parted this life in the last twelve months. 

     It is my sad duty to officially inform the Court of the passing of three of our brothers during the last year, Mr. William Helm, Mr. Paul Cuddy, and Mr. Kenneth Lyddane. 

     May it please the Court, I would present to the Court at this time the Chairman of the Bar Association’s Memorial Committee, Mr. J. Ambrose Kiley. 

     JUDGE SHOOK: Mr. Kiley. 

     MR. KILEY: May it please Your Honors, members of the Bar Association, and ladies and gentlemen: 

     Because we pass this way but once, the Montgomery County Bar Association prays this Honorable Court in the regular course of its business to suspend the usual activities and permit the Association in Open Court to express its admiration for the lives and its grief for the deaths of our three departed brother lawyers who have passed away during the twelve months since the last Memorial Service. 

     We have invited their families and friends to be present with us today, so we might express our condolences to them as well as our praise to them for having contributed to the development of these lawyers who were such worthy members of our profession. 

     Your Honors, we refer to our departed brothers: William P. Helm, Paul Q. Cuddy, and Kenneth Lyddane. 

     On behalf of the Bar Association, Mr. Albert Ginsburg will deliver a memorial on Bill Helm; Mr. Jackson Brodsky on Paul Cuddy; Mr. Alger Barbee on Kenneth Lyddane. 

     So that this Memorial Service may become a record of this Honorable Court, I move the Court, on behalf of the Bar Association of Montgomery County, Maryland, that this memorial be received by the Court, permanently filed among its records of the Court, and that the Clerk of this Court be authorized and directed to forward copies of the same to the members of the families of our departed brothers; and I further move that when this Court adjourns or stands in recess, that such adjournment or recess be in memory of William P. Helm, Paul Q. Cuddy, and Kenneth Lyddane, all of respected memory. 

     JUDGE SHOOK: Motion will be granted. 

     The Court will recognize Mr. Ginsburg. 

REMARKS BY MR. GINSBURG 

     MR. GINSBURG: Your Honors, members of the Bar, and friends, we regret that lawyers do not all fade away. They sometimes die. 

     William P. Helm, born in 1932; dies in December, 1969, the 28th; age 37. 

     In between those two dates, he acquired a Bachelor of Science from the University of Maryland, a Bachelor of Law from Georgetown University and was admitted to the Maryland Bar in 1960. With that he also acquired a wife and six children. 

     It appears to be a cold statistic unless we knew Bill Helm. Bill was a maverick who could give you a fit in a case but to know him was to love him. 

     He was knowledgeable, intellectual, articulate, a bookman, and had an enthusiasm that was infectious. 

     Bill was a sole practitioner even though he had a practice that seemed impossible for one man to handle. In spite of that, if you ever had a case with him, you would think it was the only case in his office. 

     He would “paper” you, file motions on you and make you earn every penny of your fee. 

     Bill died to complete his career of cancer. Some two years before he died he was hospitalized for a cancer down in George Washington University Hospital. I went down to visit him, and there he was lying in his bed with a pile of files a foot high dictating on a portable dictating machine. 

     He grinned when he saw me and said he was real happy to see me, and said he had been dictating a preliminary objection in a case I had filed. 

     He put it aside and opened up that little table that sits next to all these hospital beds and pulled out a bottle of punch, some cookies and some sandwiches. 

     When I asked him how come he had food in a hospital, he said he had convinced the floor nurses that he needed something to entertain guests with; and the fact that he did, they delivered sandwiches. 

     He was a true advocate both in and out of Court. 

     Some two years later when he was physically wasted away and still dictating on our little portable transcribing machine, this time motions for continuances. Bill Helm loved the law. 

     He died at a young age. He had a full life and a short life. 

     He was Commander in the Navy, active in the Reserve, active in Community affairs, a strong family man; children ages two to thirteen. 

     I know we will always remember William Helm. Thank you. 

     JUDGE SHOOK: Judge Shure will respond for the Court. 

REMARKS BY JUDGE SHURE 

     JUDGE SHURE: Members of the Bar and friends of Bill Helm, while it was not my pleasure to know Bill Helm socially during his brief career, it may be fitting that I speak for the Court about this fine young man. 

     He and I had several things in common – we both graduated from the University of Maryland; we both graduated from Georgetown University Law School; and we both practiced law in the Thirteenth Election District for Montgomery County. There the similarity ceased, as he far outdid me insofar as children were concerned. He had six to my two. 

     I did know of his tragic condition; and I observed him in my court on several occasions where he was always impressive as a student of the law. He was well-prepared, courteous but aggressive, and always giving his best in behalf of his client. 

     As has been previously stated, he was articulate, intelligent, and extremely enthusiastic about the legal profession; and all young lawyers could profit by observing his representation of a client from the inception of a case to its finality in the courtroom. 

     He maintained his active status in the Navy as a Commander, and he was extremely interested and helpful in community affairs. He was a religious man, and a dedicated family man and a great credit to himself, his country, his family and his profession. 

     William P. Helm will be sincerely missed by all those who knew him personally, or had any contact with him, directly or indirectly. 

     All members of this Circuit Bench would like to speak, but this is impractical with eleven judges. Therefore, in behalf of the members of this Bench of the Sixth Judicial Circuit of Maryland, I extend our sincere sympathy to members of his family. May God sustain them at this time.