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Memorial--Diamond, III, John (Jack) B. (Judge)
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The Honorable John B. (Jack) Diamond, III
October 26, 1909 – August 18, 1963 

     JUDGE ANDERSON: Mr. Miller.

     JAMES R. MILLER, SR., ESQ.: Your Honors, please: On behalf of the Bar Association of Montgomery County, Maryland, it is my privilege to petition this Court that a resolution be passed to the memory of John B. Diamond, III, of Rockville, Maryland, former Judge of the Peoples Court of Montgomery County.

      John B. Diamond, III, affectionately known to his many friends as “Jack” Diamond, died suddenly at his home on August 18, 1963. A native of Montgomery County, he was born at Rockville on October 26, 1909. In his early youth he lived with his parents, Herbert L. and Marie Jones Diamond, on a farm near Gaithersburg. He attended Gaithersburg Elementary School, and later St. Johns College High School in the District of Columbia, where he graduated in 1926. For the next two years he attended Catholic University. In 1928 he became employed in the automobile business, and to advance himself in this field he studied accounting at Benjamin Franklin University. It was at this time that Jack Diamond became interested in the study of law, and he enrolled at Columbus University night school, graduating in 1935 with an LLB degree. He was admitted to the District of Columbia Bar the same year, and to the Maryland Bar in 1945.

     Jack was married on October 7, 1935, to Elizabeth Parker of Washington, D. C. Three sons were born to Judge and Mrs. Diamond, namely, John B., IV; Dudley Parker, and Ronald Wayne.

     Judge Diamond started his legal career as an attorney with the Federal Housing Administration in 1936. In 1940 he joined the Staff of the United States District Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia. For a considerable portion of his nine years of practice as an Assistant U. S. District Attorney, he was in charge of the criminal prosecuting staff of the Municipal Court. He was appointed as Assistant Montgomery County Attorney in 1951, leaving that office for private practice.

     In 1955 Jack Diamond was appointed Judge of the Peoples Court of Montgomery County. In February of last year he became the Chief Judge of that Court. He was paid a singular honor in that position when he was elected to the Board of Directors of the National Association of Municipal Judges. During his tenure of office the Peoples Court received awards from the American Bar Association for its excellence in the conduct of motor vehicle cases.

     Judge Diamond had a keen insight into the problems of law enforcement.  He was able to administer justice to those brought before him with firmness, but at the same time he displayed understanding and kindness. His primary motives were to improve and protect our community and at the same time to attempt rehabilitation of the trespassers appearing before him. I believe every lawyer who practiced before him will say that he was successful to a large degree in fulfilling both those motives.

     Judge Diamond was active throughout his life in civic activities. He was one of the first presidents of the Rockville Elementary School PTA and for a number of years a Trustee of the school. He was one of the moving parties in acquiring the stadium for the Rockville High School, now Richard Montgomery High School. He was active in the Volunteer Fire Department and other community services.

     It has been my good fortune to have known Judge Diamond on a personal basis. We have spent many hours together in a duck blind. His was an unselfish, warm, good-humored, friendly personality. His passing shall indeed be regretted by this Bar. 

     On behalf of the Bar Association of Montgomery County, I move that this resolution be spread upon the minutes of this Court as permanent record of the achievements of John B. Diamond, III, and that a copy of this motion be sent to his survivors. 

     JUDGE ANDERSON: The motion will be granted, and the resolution itself will be spread upon the minutes of this Court as you request.

     JUDGE ANDERSON: This year four of our beloved members have passed away, and since there are four Judges on the Bench we have decided that we would divide among ourselves in replying to the beautiful memorials that have been offered in behalf of each member of the Bar who is now no longer with us.

     Judge Moorman, would you say just a few words.

     JUDGE MOORMAN: My colleagues, ladies and gentlemen: At a time like this, of course, one is at a loss for words to say what is in their heart when a friend and colleague has departed this life.

     I knew at least two of our deceased colleagues better than the others. I knew them all, and I feel that I had an opportunity and a privilege to have been acquainted with them to the extent to where I knew something of their personalities and that important entity called “character”. I feel that from my association with them, and particularly two of them, that I am perhaps a bit better man than I would have been had I not known them.

     I subscribe to the laudatory remarks and kind words conveyed by those who preceded me, in relation to each other.

     We should have some security in knowing that they have appeared in that Court of Last Resort before that Final Judge; and I am sure that there is a prayer from each of us that they are secure in that House not made by hand, but eternal in the heavens – that is all.

     JUDGE ANDERSON: During the time that I have been one of the Judges of this Court I came in close contact with all of the four men about whom these beautiful memorials have been offered today. I got to know them all well, and I admired and respected each one of them.

     I am going to mainly direct the few remarks that I am going to make towards Judge Diamond.

     Judge Diamond had a most distinguished career, both at the Bar and as a member of the Bench. He saw both sides of the picture. He was a wonderful lawyer, and he had the experience of a trial lawyer and a practitioner of the law. He was a devoted practitioner who looked after the interests of his clients to the highest degree; and he made a wonderful member of the Bench.

     As the Chief Judge of the Peoples Court he made an outstanding career, and he was admired by all of the lawyers who practiced before him.

     But it wasn’t as a lawyer, particularly, that I loved and admired Judge Diamond so much, is that he was a human man. Just as Mr. Miller said, he loved to hunt; he loved to fish; he loved people. He did things for the people in his community. Every day now people come to me and say how much they miss Judge Diamond, and I can thoroughly understand. 

     There is a young colored man of this community that as great many of the people around here know because he was a cripple boy; name is James Dove. Judge Diamond was very good to Jimmy Dove, and Jimmy just worshipped the ground that Judge Diamond walked on. That was the kind of man he was, and the people that knew him loved and admired him; and we are going to miss him very greatly.

     I knew all of the others. Duncan Clark was a warm and close personal friend of mine, and a very beloved person. There was nobody that knew Duncan that didn’t love him. He was particularly adapted to the practice of law. He was almost what you would call “a lawyers lawyer”. He had a brilliant legal mind and a very wonderful analytical one; and we will miss him very much.

     And what I have said about Judge Diamond and Duncan Clark applies to all.

     Bill Evans, who Judge Shure will speak on at some length, I loved to see him come in the office. I loved to have him in the office. He used to come in there in the morning and sit often before he would go to court, and I always loved him and loved for him to come into the office.

    Parnell Allen I amy not have known quite as well as the others, but he was a lawyer of the highest integrity and everyone enjoyed and felt great respect for him.

     JUDGE SHOOK: Of course I echo the sentiments of Judge Moorman and Judge Anderson and I know will of Judge Shure when he speaks about “Moon” Evans.

     Certainly today we realize more than ever that when we are gone we live in the hearts and minds of those we leave behind. These gentlemen realized this, because they lived every day of their life in such a way that it is very easy, indeed, to speak of them all today. As a matter of fact, the hardest thing is to make your remarks brief, as they must be.

     Of course Jack Diamond I knew very well from the courthouse, frequenting the courthouse. I know he was dedicated to his position as Chief Judge of the Peoples Court. He was a most conscientious lawyer and very able judge.

     Duncan Clark was a good friend of mine, and I believe he enriched everyone’s lives that he touched. He was a conscientious gentleman and I think had one of the finest legal minds that this State has ever produced. Certainly he will be remembered not only in Montgomery County but throughout the State of Maryland, where he had a most distinguished career in the Maryland Legislature.

      Parnell Allen I didn’t know as well as I knew the other two; at least not until about a year ago last spring. I knew he practiced law in Silver Spring, and I knew when he came to court he was most conscientious concerning his client, but unobtrusive in his coming and going.

     I had the opportunity to know him a little better when I met him in a city hospital last May – a year ago last May one of the members of my family were there, and when he found out that we had illness in our family he made a point every time he came to the hospital to come and see us to talk to us and to comfort us, as indeed we needed comforting.

     I found that he had a heart of gold; as big as all outdoors. He would do anything in the world that he could for us, so he told us, and I am sure that he would have.

     I found that everything he gained in his profession he gained because he worked at it. Nothing came easy to him.

     I am sorry I don’t know the members of his family but, indeed, I know why they must grieve deeply in his passing.

     May I say to them, and to all of the members of the bereaved families: May the Lord comfort you.

     JUDGE SHURE: Members of the Bench, and ladies and gentlemen of this gathering on this very solemn and unfortunate day: First of all I of course express the sentiments of the other members of the Bench and as inscribed in the resolutions with respect to all of our departed brothers.

     William Wilder Evans, as has already been echoed, did not like long eulogies, and I certainly will not betray his confidence in me over the years by making any such long declaration. I could not, however, let this occasion pass without saying a few words.

      He was generally known as “Moon” and he was an old and, indeed, a dear friend of mine, dating back to the time when we were both students at the University of Maryland. And “Moon” was a good student and he was a superior athlete. I am immediately impressed when I look through the courtroom to see the many old classmates of “Moon’s”; fellow competitors on the football and la crosse field and basketball field. Even one of his old coaches and former President of the University of Maryland, Dr. Byrd, is here. This is somewhat the indication to me of the love and esteem with which we all held “Moon”.

     It was mentioned that he was a member of ODK. This was not easy to attain. This was an organization which required superior athletic ability; superior intellectual ability and superior leadership qualities. This described “Moon” quite well.

     He and I have sons about the same age, and our sons have participated in athletics together. I knew his wife before they were married. So his loss is very personal to me.

     I have practiced -- before I went on the Bech – with him and against him, and I always found “Moon” to be industrious and completely honest.

     “Moon” liked to play, as all of you who know him well know. He liked to play and he played hard. Also, when he worked, he worked hard; and he was also interested in his community; his country, as you heard – you know about his very wonderful War record. He was interested in the Boy Scouts, the PTA; politics, and all of those things which are part of making a good community. He was an outstanding citizen of this county, State.

     It is with deep regret that I sit here before you and have to talk about him in this manner. But those of you who know him well know how I feel about it, because you feel the same way.

     We lost a great friend and a great member of the community.

     JUDGE ANDERSON: Now, are there any friends or members of the Bar who would like to say a few words about our brothers who have passed away?

     Mrs. Groner.

                BEVERLY ANNE GRONER, ESQ.: Your Honors: Duncan Clark was my friend and friend of my family for more than fifteen years. We first knew him socially and then professionally, when he was our lawyer. Later we knew him in another capacity when he was my mentor, which came about when, due to his great enthusiasm and encouragement, I undertook the study of law. His qualities as a teacher were unparalleled, and all who knew Duncan were aware of his brilliant and incisive mind.

     But what impressed me equally over the very many years, was Duncan’s moral purity and the tremendous strength of character which were the foundations of his being. He was never capable of pettiness nor of vengeful thinking. His points of view towards his fellow man in all walks of life, be they friend or even announced foe, was that of understanding and forgiving. He was truly a man of great stature, both morally and mentally.

     The awareness of loss at his passing has not diminished, and it will not, for his gifts were great and he shared them bountifully.

     JUDGE ANDERSON: Anyone else like to say a few words? Judge Noyes, would you like to just speak very briefly about Judge Diamond?

      ALFRED D. NOYES, ESQ.: Thank you sir.

     I would like to particularly mention Jack Diamond, who I had the privilege of serving with in the Peoples Court.

     I have known Jack for many years, socially and professionally, and to me knowing Jack Diamond was to know a real human being. He was a person who made you feel comfortable. He was a person who understood life. He was a person who was easy with you.

     Many mornings before Jack would go upstairs, he would stop in and we would chat for a few minutes. And these were occasions when sometimes we would talk of things regarding the Court, and sometimes they were things that were personal that we would talk about in a friendly way, and I remember these.

     Jack had a feeling for people, and I think that we can remember that in his professional life and in his association with people he demonstrated what it meant to be a Christian gentleman, and a fine attorney; excellent judge.

     JUDGE ANDERSON: Anyone else like to say a few words?

     DAVID E. BETTS, ESQ.: It please the Court, I would like to make a few remarks about our good friend and neighbor Jack Diamond.

     I think I knew him in a little different category, because we were, together with Charley Beard, and my brother-in-law, we were the founders of Upton Street at the time when it was a dead end street when we could sit out on a Saturday night and sit in the street and shell peas, as we did on one occasion, and where we could go back and forth to other peoples’ houses and make strawberry ice cream, and homely pursuits of that nature. And Jack was such a completely warm individual; it is probably a hackneyed phrase, but it was never truer in this case. I don’t believe, that to say “To know him was to love him.” He was that kind of warm hearted, attractive, friendly, very wonderful gentleman.

     He too, as was pointed out, was a fine family man. His home, his wife and children meant a lot to him.

     He worked hard at his profession. He worked hard and sincerely and conscientiously from the Bench.

     I feel, as we all do, that we lost a very good, warm friend.

     JUDGE ANDERSON: Mr. Welsh.

     BARNARD T. WELSH, ESQ.: It please the Court, I would direct my attention, if I may, to these four gentlemen.

     First, Parnell Allen: We crossed our swords in the courtroom, in the arena of the criminal law. He earned the respect of all of the members of the Bar in this field because he never stopped probing the frontiers of the criminal law. Had Parnell Allen been fortunate enough to live there is no question in my mind that he would have been one of the outstanding men in the field of criminal law. It is our loss that he is gone.

    I knew Duncan Clark well when I was down at the Kelly Building before it burned up. Didn’t have any place to go; went over to John Oxley’s, and there I formed a fast friendship with Duncan.

     I used to go upstairs and ask his advice on cases. There was one awful tough case that he helped me out with, it was an unfortunate case, didn’t seem to have any solution, and it wasn’t any coincidence that when my back to the wall, or Bench, perhaps, I couldn’t get around my points, I would go to Duncan Clark. He was a man that I say not only had great knowledge of the law, but he had imagination, and it was in that area that I thought he was superb.

     Now, Debby and Starke, my friendship with your father goes on about four or five different bases.

     First, on the atheletic field. He didn’t play the sport that I liked – probably it wasn’t rough enough for him. But I played baseball with him and softball, and it is not accident that he is in the Maryland House of Fame, because he was an athlete from the word go, just like Judge Shure said. If the Yankees had him they wouldn’t have been beaten in four straight. He’d cut the throat of the Dodgers.

     I recall him running the Independent. Now, it wasn’t popular to run the Independent in those days in Montgomery County. Weren’t supposed to be independent. This was the order of independence and “Moon” Evans contributed a vast amount to the freedom of thought in politics by that newspaper.

     Now, being a lawyer, what kind of lawyer was he? He was perhaps the most tenacious, and in my opinion the most stubborn lawyer that a person could draw when you started seeing who your adversary was going to be. If I got a paper in the mail and it had “Moon’s” name down at the bottom, I said “Let’s just close the doors, we are in for a battle.”

     You don’t know what pleasure it gives me to know thay my daughter Margaret is your roommate. I am honored.

     I see Betty Diamond; what I had to say about Jack I wrote. He was a dear friend of mine, and he carried with him to the Bench the boys that he helped to raise. I suppose that every lawyer in Montgomery County knew when they went before Jack Diamond that if the scales had to be balanced those boys were right in that courtroom. He never lost sight of his family, and some of the happy days that I have spent was with the Diamond family in those golden days at Bethany Beach where we were skilled ocean going swimmers, and eat hardshell crabs and talk about how good they were, and how we were going to accomplish Justice, and who was going to win what game, and how the fish were biting.

     And I know of no man in this county that was loved more than your husband, or more than your father.

     It was a privilege to know these four lawyers, and the common denominator of all four of them to me is “men”; they were men, there was no mistaking – all four of them.

     Thank you, Your Honors.

     JUDGE ANDERSON: Mr. Simpson.

     JOSEPH B. SIMPSON, ESQ: With Your Honor’s premission: I would like to say, on behalf of myself and the members of our firm, that I was away at the time of the unfortunate death of both Bill Evans and Jack Diamond, and it came to me as a great shock that these two fine men –

      I went to school with “Moon” Evans, and his scholarly qualifications are well known to me. As I was trying to get through constitutional law he was doing it as if there were absolutely nothing to it. We sat right next to each other. He was an able and fine lawyer.

     Duncan Clark was the man that I selected when it became necessary in our office to have someone who was highly able and skilled in the Workmen’s Compensation Act to help us, and he did that graciously and with the complete skill of a fine, friendly lawyer.

     I knew Parnell Allen pretty well, and I fortunately was able to go by to see him – or, “fortunately”, if there could be such a word used with reference to the passing of such a young man, I had the privilege of visiting the funeral home when he was there.

     Parnell will always be well remembered by me, and when I would have some base that would get publicity or notoriety, Parnell would drop me a note and he would have looked up something that he thought might be of some help or benefit; and I had a warm feeling for that young fellow.

     I knew Jack Diamond, of course, for many, many years. When he was a prosecutor in the District, where had an able and very distinguished record. I knew him when he came here as the Assitatn County Attorney, and , also I knew him as a member of our Peoples Court Bench. I understand from talking to those members of the Bench that he was an able adminstrator fo the Court’s business in addition to being a fair and just Judge.

     So, on behalf of myself and my friends, I would like to express to the family of each of these good friends of ours our deep, sincere sympathy in the loss of each one of them.

     Thank you, sir.

     JUDGE ANDERSON: Mr. Christopher.

     JAMES C. CHRISTOPHER, ESQ.: With the Courts’ permission: 

     I would like to say that I never knew Parnell Allen, except as a newcomer to the Bar, until I was elected President Elect of the Bar Association a little over two years ago.

     I soon realized and understood that we had a man in Parnell Allen who was a tireless worker for the Association; would accept a committee appointment; work hard at it, and would volunteer for other committees and for more work.

     I found that he was very unobtrusive, very sincerely genuine in his attitude toward people, toward his client, and towards the Association and his brother lawyers.

     When we come to speak of the other three, Jack Diamond; “Moon” Evans, and Duncan Clark, I guess I feel their passing as much as anyone in this room. I knew them all quite well and spent much time with them prior to beginning my now almost 32 years in the practice of my profession.

     I could go on to say something vividly regarding each which is very dear to my heart. It would be highly repetitious, in some instances, of what has already been said. I would just like to say that there is nothing that has been said here in these Memorials to which I cannot personally and whole heartily say, “Amen, I miss them too.”

     JUDGE ANDERSON: I think it is very fitting in closing this very solemn ceremony that we should all respect the Lord’s Prayer.

     Reverend Valliant, would you come forward and lead us in the Lord’s Prayer.

     (The assemblage was led in prayer by Reverend Valliant)

     JUDGE ANDERSON: The Court now stands adjourned until tomorrow morning at 9:30.

     (Whereupon, at 3:00 o’clock p.m., October 7, 1963, the Memorial Services were concluded). 

 

To the Honorable, the Judges of the Circuit Court for Montgomery County

     On behalf of the Bar Association of Montgomery County, Maryland, it is my privilege to petition this Court that a resolution be passed to the memory of John B. Diamond, III, of Rockville, Maryland, former Judge of the People’s Court of Montgomery County.

     John B. Diamond, III, affectionaely known to his many friends as “Jack” Diamond, died suddenly at his home on August 18, 1963. A native of Montgomery County, he was born at Rockville on October 26, 1909. In his early youth he lived with his parents, Herbert L. and Marie Jones Diamond, on a farm near Gaithersburg. He attended Gaithersburg Elementary School, and later St. Johns College High School in the District of Columbia, where he graduated in 1926. For the next two years he attended Catholic University. In 1923 he became employed in the automobile business, and to advance himself in this field he studied accounting at Benjamin Franklin University. It was at this time that Jack Diamond became interested in the study of law, and he enrolled at Columbus University night school, graduating in 1935 with an LLB degree. He was admitted to the District of Columbia Bar the same year and to the Maryland Bar in 1945.

     Jack was married on October 7, 1935 to Elizabeth Parker of Washington, D.C. Three sons were born to Judge and Mrs. Diamond, John B., IV, Dudley Parker, and Ronald Wayne.

     Judge Diamond started his legal career as an attorney with the Federal Housing Administration in 1936. In 1940 he joined the Staff of the United States District Attorney’s Office for the District of Columbia. For a considerable portion of his nine years of practice as an Assistant U. S. District Attorney, he was in charge of the criminal prosecuting staff of the Municipal Court. He was appointed as Assistant Montgomery County Attorney in 1951, leavintg that office for private practice.

     In 1955 Jack Diamond was appointed Judge of the Peoples Court of Montgomery County. In February of last year he became the Chief Judge of that Court. He was paid a singular honor in that position when he was elected to the Board of Directors of the National Association of Municipal Judges. During his tenure of office the Peoples Court received awards from the American Bar Association for its excellence in the conduct of motor vehicle cases.

     Judge Diamond had a keen insight into the problems of law enforcement. He was able to administer justice to those brought before him with firmness, but at the same time he displayed understanding and kindness.  His primary motives were to improve and protect our community and at the same time to attempt rehabilitation of the tespassers appearing before him. I believe every lawyer who practiced before him will say that he was successful to a large degree in fulfilling both these motives.

     Judge Diamond was active throughout his life in civic activities. He was one of the first presidents of the Rockville Elementary School PTA and for a number of years a Trustee of the school. He was one of the moving parties in acquiring the stadium for the Rockville High School, now Richard Montgomery High School. He was active in the Volunteer Fire Department and other community services.

     It has been my good fortune to have known Judge Diamond on a personal basis.  We have spent many hours together in a duck blind. His was an unselfish, warm, good-humored, friendly personality. His passing shall indeed be regretted by this Bar.

     On behalf of the Bar Association of Montgomery County, I move that this resolution be spread upon the minutes of this Court as permanent record of the achievements of John B. Diamond, III, and that a copy of this motion be sent to his survivors.

                                                                                                Respectfully submitted,

                                                                                                James R. Miller, Sr.