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Memorial--Bouic, William Viers (Judge)
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The Honorable William Viers Bouic
Passed Away on May 4, 1896 

Liber l, page l - Circuit Court

Montgomery County, Maryland

The Court ordered that the proceedings of this meeting of the members of the Bar of Montgomery County, held on the llth day of May, 1896, to adopt Resolutions upon the death of Honorable William Veirs Bouic, late Associate Judge of this Court, adopted by said meeting be recorded upon the minutes of this Court as follows:

The members of the Bar Association of Montgomery County, having heard with profound regret of the death of the Honorable Williams Veirs Bouic, a late judge of the Sixth Judicial Circuit of Maryland and desiring to place upon record a tribute to his memory, adopt for the purpose of the following sketch of his life, prepared by one who was for a number of years his business associate, and direct the President of the Bar Association to present the same to the Circuit Court for Montgomery County at the June term thereof.

Judge Bouic died at his residence in this town on Monday, the 4th at about the age of eighty years. Judge Bouic was born near Edward's Ferry in Medleys District, in this county in l816. His family was prominent and influential in the Department of Seine Infeneure, France. He was therefore of Norman blood. His father Pierre Amble Franquille Bouic came to this country from that Department of France. His uncle, Louis Dominic Bouic, who died at a very advanced age but a few years ago, was Canon of the Cathedral of Notre Dame. His mother was Mrs. Fletcher, who was a Miss Veirs, of Medleys District, and through her he was related to nearly all of the more prominent families in the western section of this county.

Judge Bouic received his early education at the public schools in his neighborhood, but at the age of twelve came to Rockville and entered the Academy here, then under the charge of Dr. Mines, a distinguished Presbyterian divine. After completing his courses at this institution, he engaged for a few years in the in the mercantile business. Afterwards entered the law office of Mr. John Brewer, a distinguished lawyer of this place with whom he continued his professional studies until he was admitted to the Bar of this county in l840.

After his admission to the Bar, he moved to Warrenton, Missouri, where he engaged in the practice of his profession and remained there for two years. He then again returned to Rockville and married Miss Mary, daughter of Samuel C. Veirs of this town. Owing to the unwillingness of his wife to go with him to Missouri, he abandoned the growing business he had established there, and consequently entered into the practice of his profession in Rockville. His ability as a lawyer, industry and attention to business soon obtained recognition and resulted in the establishment of a large and lucrative law practice.

In 1849 he was appointed by the Attorney General of Maryland, Deputy Attorney General for Montgomery County. That office was abolished by the Convention of l860, and he was in the latter years selected State's Attorney of the County. He continued to hold this office by successive elections until the fall of 1867, when he was elected Associate Judge of the Sixth Judicial Circuit for Maryland for the term of fifteen years.

Judge Bouic in addition to his professional and judicial duties was largely engaged in agriculture, giving much of his time and attention to his large and handsomely improved farm. He was also an active Democratic Politician and from his campaign of l844, when he campaigned the county for Polk and Dallas, he took an active part in every political contest until his failing health compelled his removal from public life. He was always an eloquent and interesting speaker. He also took much interest in county, municipal and educational matters in the Montgomery County Agricultural Society and was the secretary of the first meeting held for that purpose and continued as its secretary until 1870.

With the aid of his life long friend Robert J. Brent of Baltimore, he prepared and procured the enactment of the original Charter of the town of Rockville. He was Mayor of the town by successive elections from its incorporation until he was rendered ineligible for the position by his elevation to the Bench in the Fall of 1867. He was for many years a member of the Board of Trustees of the Rockville Academy, and he took a lively interest in the prosperity and success of that time honored and most useful institution of learning.

He was also for many years the director of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. He as counsel for the old Metropolitan Railroad Company and used every effort to secure the building of that road and when that enterprise failed, he persistently urged upon the Baltimore and Ohio, the continuation of the Metropolitan Branch and was largely instrumental in procuring the creation of the road and it was due to him that the clause was inserted requiring it to be built with half a mile of the Inn of Rockville.

Judge Bouic from the time he settled among us until his retirement from active life filled a large space in the history of our county. He was identified with and earnestly and zealously advanced and promoted every useful public enterprise and was almost equally helpful in his various private pursuits and enterprises, giving almost constant employment to artisans and laborers at remunerative wages. He was also very charitable but gave in such an unostentatious manner, that few but his most intimate friends knew the variety and extent of his benefaction. He was a warm, devoted and constant friend and would spare no effort or labor to serve one who had promoted his professional or political fortunes. Although he had a full and well-rounded life and attained to a number of years allotted to but few, still death is never welcome to family and friends and we extend to them our warmest sympathy in their bereavement.